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Readying AI for Your Digital Workforce? Five Pitfalls to Avoid

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Readying AI for Your Digital Workforce-Five Pitfalls to Avoid

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In the fast-changing, high-demand digital world, workers are going to have a lot of questions as they encounter complex technology. AI should be a “personal assistant” for many of those questions. Like a good hotel concierge, this artificially intelligent personal assistant should anticipate their needs, have ready answers, provide them in the questioner’s language, and in their preferred method. AI implementations have a rocky history, often falling short of expectations, disappointing users, and squandering time, budget, and competitiveness. To avoid that fate, we have identified the typical pitfalls and offer five keys for avoiding them.

You’ve been handed the project of your dreams: developing an artificial intelligence (AI) service management solution for your digital workers. It will be a high-profile project, visible to every employee, from the CEO, to the salespeople demoing for big customers, to the colleagues you work with every day. They will turn to your system with high expectations when they are held back, uncertain, and in a hurry.

Will they be among the forward-moving fortunate, enjoying the benefits of AI, helping them solve their problems, increase their knowledge, and perform at their best? Or will they get left behind because of the pitfalls that plague AI implementations?

Let’s start with the end in mind: Just what are the expectations of AI in the digital workplace?

In the fast-changing, high-demand digital world, workers are going to have a lot of questions as they encounter complex technology. AI should be a “personal assistant” for many of those questions. Like a good hotel concierge, this artificially intelligent personal assistant should anticipate their needs, have ready answers, provide them in the questioner’s language, and in their preferred method.

AI can also take over low-level tasks, allowing knowledge workers to focus their time and energy on higher cognitive pursuits. For the digital worker looking to rise in the organization and take on bigger responsibilities with more visibility, AI can accelerate and simplify routine tasks. It can automate support in ways that save time and can be delivered 24/7 while also gathering intelligence on worker needs and responses.

And there’s another crucial expectation that cannot be overlooked in today’s tight job market for skilled digital workers. Management recognizes that today’s workers demand up-to-date technology and will leave companies that fall behind. According to a survey of 7,000 workers in the U.S., Asia, and Europe, most workers globally want to use AI. And Oracle found that 70% of workers use AI in their personal lives, yet only 24% use AI at work. Unisys research on the Digital Workplace Divide reveals that employees are six times more likely to want to quit their job when they work for a “technology laggard.”

But AI implementations have a rocky history, often falling short of expectations, disappointing users, and squandering time, budget, and competitiveness. To avoid that fate, we have identified the typical pitfalls and offer five keys for avoiding them.

Weston Morris

Weston Morris

Weston Morris lidera la estrategia global para tecnologías emergentes que afectan a la productividad de los trabajadores digitales, incluidos el procesamiento del lenguaje natural, la inteligencia artificial, la automatización, la realidad fusionada, la virtualización y el IoT.